Gezi

What Tunisia and Ben Ali taught me about Erdogan’s future

What Tunisia and Ben Ali taught me about Erdogan's future

What Tunisia and Ben Ali taught me about Erdogan’s future

Two weeks after I came home from a touristic travel to Tunisia in early december 2010, the uprising against Ben Ali started. I was surprised, since I had traveled throughout the whole country and talked to many people, not the least students, asking them what feelings they harboured for the man in charge. Except minor complaints about the high unemployment, all they said was positive. Education was free, people were happy. I left the country with a totally wrong perception of Ben Alis popularity. I had been naïve, and the Arab spring came as a surprise to me.

Ben ali Tunisia Erdogan Turkey

Ben ali Tunisia Erdogan Turkey

But I would would fall into the same trap twice…

During my two years in Turkey, before the Gezi protests, politics was something that people smoothly avoided to talk openly about at dinner tables where not all guests where known. Only at closed gathering, in my predominantly secular circles of friends, did some anger and the dissatisfaction with Erdogan’s politics show. But this I only realised in hindsight and I was therefore surprised when the Gezi protests took place and grew to a national phenomenon. I could never have guessed they would occur one week before they started.

I came to draw the conclusion that in an environment, where critical opinions can´t be ventilated on a continuous basis, sudden, unexpected outbursts – such as the Gezi protests and the Arab Spring- will always be the way of change – BY DESIGN.

So, what can this teach us about the future of Erdogan, the feelings about him in his own circles now so celebrating, supporting and free of criticism against him?

Does the silence and acceptance within the AKP mean that no one harbours any criticism towards him?

Most definitely not.
One example: Bulent Arinc is by many looked upon as the reasonable voice of AKP, before so talkative on all issues. Why has he recently been so silent?

And what does the grass roots of the AKP think about the Soma accident where no secularists where victims, but instead people like the ones Erdogan says he is trying to help?

Does people close to Erdogan buy his explanation and his denial of any involvement in the company who manages the mine?

Do the AKP believe in the Robot Lobisi?

I have decided not to fall into the same trap a third time. The AKP keep silent, just like the liberals and the secularistic Turkey did before the Gezi protests, before they had enough, before it all had built up to being just more than they could accept. But I know better now.

I know that that silence harbours more criticism than thousand words are capable of.

Piece by piece Erdogan is building up a heavy pile sh*% that will eventually fall down on him, crush him, bye bye!

 

Advertisements

Leaked voice recording proves Erdogan’s grip on Turkish media

A voice recording between prime minister Tayyip Erdogan and Mehmet Fatih Saraç, the deputy chairman of the Ciner Media Group, that owns the TV channel Haberturk, was published on Youtube yesterday. It is direct proof that Erdogan personally intervenes to control the media in Turkey.

The conversation took place on the 4th of June 2013, in the middle of the Gezi protests. At the time of the conversation, Erdogan is in Morocco watching Haberturk. He is upset because the channel is broadcasting a news ticker informing of a speech where the opposition party leader, Bahçeli, is calling for President, Abdullah Gül to interfere in the situation (i.e. to override Erdogan). Erdogan orders Saraç to take the ticker out of broadcast. Saraç sounds scared, nervously repeating that he is going to take care of the situation immediately.

Here comes my own rough translation of the conversation (based on a original transcript in Turkish taken from Bugün):

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan: Fatih, look, right now I…

Mehmet Fatih Saraç: Yes, Mr. Prime minister

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan: I am here in Marocco watching TV…

Mehmet Fatih Saraç: Yes, Sir!

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan: … all of Bahceli’s talk is shown and now, the talk is also running as a text below.

Mehmet Fatih Saraç: Got it, Sir! Right now! Ok!

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan: And in Bahceli’s written text it says that the presidents first responsibility is being in meetings, but additional to these meetings he should take care of the situation…

Mehmet Fatih Saraç: I got it, Sir!

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan: … through these meetings he should take steps to bring peace to the country

Mehmet Fatih Saraç: Ok Sir!

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan: I mean Bahceli said this, and it is constantly going as a text on the TV

Mehmet Fatih Saraç: Ok sir! Got it sir! Right now sir!

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan: You say you understand, but my god, why do I need to call you about something like this?

Mehmet Fatih Saraç: Ok, your order, Sir! I got it!

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan:  Right now… It has to be done!

Mehmet Fatih Saraç: I am doing it right now, Sir!

After this conversation, the video above includes voice recordings in which you can hear Saraç calling other people to have the ticker being taken out of broadcast on the prime minister’s order!

Two Simple Questions to Abdullah Gül!

Two Simple Question to Adbullah Gül

Two Simple Question to Adbullah Gül

Yesterday my father sent me an email with a link. It directed me to an article informing that the Turkish president Abdullah Gül signed a law that would make it illegal to give first aid to anyone without the government’s permission (click here for NY Times version).

‘What is your comment on this?´ my father wrote next to the link.

I still haven’t answered his mail, because I don’t know where to begin. There are so many layers of stupidity behind the enactment of this law, so many angles to attack it from. So lets just ask four simple questions:

First, is there any other country in the world where it is illegal to give first aid to an injured or dying person? (I would really like to know! Send me a message!)

Secondly, if your son got severely injured (God forbid), Tayyip Erdogan, would you not want people to help him? Of course you would!

Since I consider Erdogan as a lost case, my last two questions instead go to Abdullah Gül:

How will this law in any way make Turkey a better country?

and

How did it feel to illegalize care for fellow human beings?

RSVP

A Gezi protest within the AK Party?

It is easy to forget that the AK Party is a political unit that most likely would function without it’s leader Tayyip Erdogan. The way that Erdogan rules the party, reminds more of a military commander directing his troops on the battlefield than a democratically elected leader that listen, learn and argue. Those who question Erdogan are immediately expelled from the party. Given that, it is natural that Erdogan takes all criticism personal. Criticizing AK Party means criticizing him.

Lately, however, we have witnessed some interesting signs of resistance against Erdogan in a way that was unthinkable just one year ago. It started with the former famous football player and deputy Hakan Şükur, who resigned December 16, publicly slamming Erdogan for his plan to close down the prep schools, seen as an direct attack on the Islamic scholar Fetullah Gülen, who Hakan Şükur stands close. And after the graft probe was initiated one day later, additionally eight deputies resigned, as a protest against Erdogan’s way of interfering in the ongoing probe, trying to obstruct the justice. Even the finance minister, Mehmet Şimşek, criticized the sacking of police officers initially, but suddenly became very quite on the issue. Most likely, these objections are the tip of an iceberg, and if the political unrest continues, we might witness a Gezi protest within the AK Party. Such a protest would probably erupt equally unexpected as the Gezi protests that took place in Taksim in June 2013. That’s the way it works in Turkey. People are friendly and patient, but there is always a limit. I know that not least from personal experiences.

The critical point that has to be reached for this to happen is that members of the party start to see Erdogan as more of a liability than an asset. Because of the way Erdogan dominates the party, it is easy to forget that not all leading members are corrupt and democratically blinded by a will for power. The AK Party is not the problem. Erdogan is! His response to the graft probe clearly signals that he is more interested in saving his own family than developing Turkey into a true democracy. If he continues along that path without managing to stabilize the political situation, that critical point might be reached much sooner than anyone would guess.

So, what is Erdogan afraid of? Is it to lose the money he has stacked away? Most likely! But even if it weren’t for the corruption charges against his family, he would still be deadly afraid of losing his political immunity. Considering the amount of enemies he has created over the years, not the least within the military because of the Ergenekon trial, staying in power is the only way to survive in a country like Turkey. Thus, Erdogan stepping down voluntarily is not a likely scenario. Excluding the opportunity of an enormous failure for the AK Party in the upcoming elections of 2014, a Gezi protest within AKP is the most likely way forward for democracy in Turkey!

A Gezi protest within the Ak Party

A Gezi protest within the Ak Party